Tiered Assignment

Tiered Assignment-82
Tiered learning refers to creating lessons that are modified in various ways to meet the individual needs of each child. Teaching a tiered lesson on a topic such as the rain forest, for instance, may mean one group writes a story about visiting the rain forest while another colors and labels pictures of rain forest plants and animals.Exceptional children, slow learners and children with kinetic learning styles all benefit from tailored lessons. Outgoing students might attempt a persuasive speech on preserving the rain forest. A classroom contains students of various levels of academic readiness, interests, learning styles and disabilities.

Tiered learning refers to creating lessons that are modified in various ways to meet the individual needs of each child. Teaching a tiered lesson on a topic such as the rain forest, for instance, may mean one group writes a story about visiting the rain forest while another colors and labels pictures of rain forest plants and animals.Exceptional children, slow learners and children with kinetic learning styles all benefit from tailored lessons. Outgoing students might attempt a persuasive speech on preserving the rain forest. A classroom contains students of various levels of academic readiness, interests, learning styles and disabilities.

In tiered lessons, students work in teacher-assigned groups according to the chosen tiering strategy, such as grouping students by their current level of understanding for the topic of study.

The number of groups per tier can vary, as can the number of students per tier.

Exceptional children, slow learners and children with kinetic learning styles all benefit from tailored lessons.

Reading abilities within a classroom may vary by several grade levels.

There is no rule that states there may only be three tiers, however.

The number of tiers depends on the range of ability levels in the classroom.

Grouping by Readiness Level A lesson tiered by readiness level implies that the teacher has a good understanding of the students’ ability levels with respect to the lesson and has designed the tiers to meet those needs.

Many examples of lessons tiered in readiness have three tiers: below grade level, at grade level, and above grade level.

Respectively, the spacial, kinesthetic and verbal learner are engaged. A classroom contains students of various levels of academic readiness, interests, learning styles and disabilities.

Exceptional children, slow learners and children with kinetic learning styles all benefit from tailored lessons. Cheryl Adams of Ball State University suggests focusing on either the process, content or product rather than all three at once.

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