Mansfield Park Essays

Mansfield Park Essays-71
Recent readers of Mansfield Park have sought to highlight what they believe Jane Austen did not, the fact that the lifestyle of Mansfield Park was dependent on the slave trade.Mr Bertram we are told has a sugar plantation in Antigua and the only reference to slavery is that of a shy question posed by Fanny on his return from his estate there.--Submitted by Anonymous Fanny Price is a lucky girl. Surely she was fortunate in being rescued from her mothers foolishly self-inflicted poverty (all for love, pshaw!

Recent readers of Mansfield Park have sought to highlight what they believe Jane Austen did not, the fact that the lifestyle of Mansfield Park was dependent on the slave trade.Mr Bertram we are told has a sugar plantation in Antigua and the only reference to slavery is that of a shy question posed by Fanny on his return from his estate there.--Submitted by Anonymous Fanny Price is a lucky girl. Surely she was fortunate in being rescued from her mothers foolishly self-inflicted poverty (all for love, pshaw!It is hard to say, until the long-suspected drama unfolds in London and Edmund and Fanny they will emerge from the obscurity they were always held in.--Submitted by kiki1982. Help us introduce it to others by writing a better introduction for it. One of the things I did not really get in Mansfield Park was what the big deal was about putting on the play.

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She is raised as was the custom not on equal terms with her cousins but as her position dictated, that she should be at all times agreeable to the family and to know her place.

She is constantly reminded of this by her mother's other sister Mrs Norris.

Lady Bertram, Mrs Norris, Mrs Grant and Dr Grant don't seem to have a problem with it.

Lovers' Vows does not seem like a very scandalous play.

Thomas turns out a wasteful son, Maria and Julia to have a short concentration span.

Only Edmund and Fanny seem to be able to keep their heads focused, but they are never asked for their (sensible) opinions.Edmund and Fanny's sense of propriety just seems incredible.I wonder whether Jane Austen was just being too subtle for me, or that the 200 year time gap was too hard to bridge.Each of the six novels she completed in her lifetime are, in effect, comic cautionary tales that end happily for those characters who play by the rules and badly for those who don't.In Mansfield Park, for example, Austen gives us Fanny Price, a poor young woman who has grown up in her wealthy relatives' household without ever being accepted as an equal.The heroine of Mansfield Park is by some considered insipid, Fanny Price the eldest daughter of a mother from a wealthy family who chose to marry for love and live in poverty is at the tender age of 10 sent to live with her mother's wealthy sister and her family.The Bertrams have two sons and two daughters and the youngest son treats her with kindness.She is invaluable in her companionship to her Aunt Bertram and refuses to join in when her cousins and the Crawfords decide to stage A Lover's Vows in her uncle's absence, knowing that he would dislike it.Miss Crawford befriends the downtrodden Fanny and Mr Crawford is attracted to her.Certain rules applied to who was eligible and who was not, how one courted and married and what one expected afterwards.To flout these rules was to tear at the basic fabric of society, and the consequences could be terrible.

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