Essays On Mentoring

Essays On Mentoring-9
These programs, and the schools with which they collaborate, often share classroom space, photocopying materials, audio-video equipment, and staff assistance in order to minimize expenses.Furthermore, because young folks spend a significant portion of their day in schools, a school-based mentor (or a team of mentors) is able to connect with a larger group of students within a single space and time.These interactions may occur on the weekend when mentors have free time.

These programs, and the schools with which they collaborate, often share classroom space, photocopying materials, audio-video equipment, and staff assistance in order to minimize expenses.Furthermore, because young folks spend a significant portion of their day in schools, a school-based mentor (or a team of mentors) is able to connect with a larger group of students within a single space and time.These interactions may occur on the weekend when mentors have free time.

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On the whole, youth matched with mentors show a decrease in the following behaviors: stress, alcohol and illegal drug use, truancy, peer violence, and recidivism among juvenile offenders.

Youth mentoring has also demonstrated an influence in building resiliency; character and competence; and a sense of connectedness with school, peers, and family.

Many mentoring programs are geared toward helping youth cope with difficult social and economic circumstances.

Programs like Community for Youth (Washington), Mentor/Mentee (Arkansas), Project 2000 (Washington, D.

As youth mentoring programs have proliferated over the years, the school-based approach has become an increasingly popular alternative to the community-based model.

The primary advantages of school-based mentoring are that it is cost-effective and can operate in a peer group format.Traditionally, youth mentoring has focused on those children and adolescents who are considered to be at risk or “underserved.” Associated with these categories are academic failure, dropout, limited parental involvement, drug and alcohol abuse, and high exposure to violent surroundings.These deficits, combined with limited community resources (e.g., youth facilities, athletic clubs, and violence prevention programs), as well as the breakdown of the traditional family unit, have been thought to produce a feeling of social detachment among youth.Mentoring can be highly structured or loosely arranged depending on the format under which it occurs.There are generally two kinds of mentoring formats: the community-based model or the school-based approach.C.), and Youth Outreach Services (Illinois) reach local populations, whereas larger organizations such as the National Mentoring Partnership, America’s Promise, and Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America (BIGS) operate on a national scale.BIGS, established in 1904, is America’s largest youth mentoring association, operating in forty-one states and matching 70,000 young people with adult mentors.Most programs, depending on the needs of their population, employ curricula and resources that emphasize academic achievement, social competency, rites of passage, child rearing, career training, health education, spiritual development, and arts education.Despite this mixture of programming, the main objectives of youth mentoring are to enhance academic performance, build parental and peer relationships, and promote self-esteem and self-worth.Sociological research has noted that the absence of loving and supportive families negatively affects children’s behavioral development, leading to antisocial, aggressive, and even violent outcomes.Mentoring seeks to address this by fostering meaningful relationships with youngsters that enable them to thrive despite the daily obstacles that they encounter.

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