Dramatic Monologue My Last Duchess Essay

Dramatic Monologue My Last Duchess Essay-41
Try it risk-free In this lesson, we'll read through Robert Browning's terrific poem 'My Last Duchess.' Browning slowly reveals the character of the speaker as he discusses his now-deceased wife in front of a painting of her hanging on the wall.

Try it risk-free In this lesson, we'll read through Robert Browning's terrific poem 'My Last Duchess.' Browning slowly reveals the character of the speaker as he discusses his now-deceased wife in front of a painting of her hanging on the wall.

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The poem is structured around him talking about a painting of his 'last duchess' - or Lucrezia - who's now dead.As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more.Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.So her offense, of thanking everybody the same, is even more egregious because she owes him her station in life; that's what he's implying.And the 'she thanked men' part tells us it's not just about her being happy. It seems like what he's saying is that he thinks it's beneath him to criticize her, to tell her what she's doing wrong.You can kind of tell because it's got 'my' in the title.That tips you off that it might be in the first person and therefore might be a monologue.He also points out that since he's always there when people see the painting, people always ask him this, and he reveals that he keeps it covered behind a curtain. If you have a portrait of your dead wife, why would you cover it up behind a curtain?If it's because it's upsetting, why do you show it to strangers? Sir, 'twas not Her husband's presence only, called that spot Of joy into the Duchess' cheek: perhaps Fra Pandolf chanced to say, 'Her mantle laps Over my lady's wrist too much,' or 'Paint Must never hope to reproduce the faint Half-flush that dies along her throat:' such stuff Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough For calling up that spot of joy.But in a monologue, part of the fun is figuring out who is this guy? This particular dramatic monologue is thought to be spoken by the 16th-century Italian Duke of Ferrara, who was a real dude.He married a daughter of the Medici family named Lucrezia when she was only 13 years old - OMG, that's so young.

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